Dandelion Radio
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'Broadcast One' - Dandelion Radio's 1st compilation album

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Artist Info

The Fibonaccis

The Fibonaccis
Image from Discogs
Powered by Audioscrobbler™The Fibonaccis rose out of the early-'80s punk scene in Los Angeles, CA. Drawing from a wide range of influences including film scores, circus music, as well as an interest in bizarre pop culture in general, the band took their name after Leonardo Fibonacci, the 14th Century Italian mathematician. The group's first lineup consisted of Magie Song (vocals, percussion), John Dentino (keyboards), Joe Berardi (drums, percussion), and Ron Stringer (guitar, bass). Fibonaccis' first record was released in 1982 on the Index label, (fi'-bo-na'-chez). Mixing their many influences, the band emerged with intelligent keyboard passages, over-the-top vocals, and surf-influenced guitar work. With a rising reputation as a live band, the group performed bizarre versions of "Purple Haze" and the theme from the film Psycho in their sets. In 1983, the band released the EP Slow Beautiful Sex with new member Tom Corey (bass, mandolin, vocals). Though they continued to appear live occasionally, they did not release any new material until 1986. By this point, Stringer had left the group and was replaced by Corey. The band wrote the soundtrack to the cult horror/comedy film TerrorVision, and had high hopes, but the film and the soundtrack did not do as well as hoped. The group then returned to the studio to record Civilization and Its Discotheques (1987), which was a frustrating process, and the band broke up afterwards.

-Geoff Orens, All Music Guide


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Artist biography from last.fm




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last.fm
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