Dandelion Radio
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'Broadcast One' - Dandelion Radio's 1st compilation album

NEWS:
We have a new DJ starting this month - do seek him out and say hello

Artist Info

Faye Adams

Faye Adams
Image from Discogs
Powered by Audioscrobbler™As Faye Scruggs (her married name), she became a regular performer in New York nightclubs in the late 1940s and early 1950s. While performing in Atlanta, Georgia, she was discovered by singer Ruth Brown, who won her an audition with bandleader Joe Morris of Atlantic Records. Changing her name to Faye Adams, Morris recruited her as a singer in 1952, and signed her to Herald Records. Her first release was Morris's song "Shake a Hand", which topped the U.S. R&B chart for ten weeks in 1953 and made number 22 on the U.S. pop chart.

In 1954, Faye had two more R&B chart toppers with "I'll Be True" (covered by Bill Haley) and "It Hurts Me to My Heart". During this period, she left the Morris band and was billed as "Atomic Adams". In 1955 she appeared in the film Rhythm & Blues Revue, and in 1957 moved to Imperial Records, but her commercial success diminished. By the late 1950s she was seen as an older recording artist whose time had come and gone, although she continued to record for various smaller labels until the early 1960s.

By 1963 she had retired from the music industry. She returned to her gospel roots and family life in New Jersey.
Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply.
Artist biography from last.fm




Some other places to look for information:
last.fm
Discogs
MusicBrainz